Sofie LH

The Media Conservator

5 notes &

The Book Damage Atlas

conservethis:

This Book Damage Atlas is a tool which enables to recognize damage and determine its extent. The Atlas presents the descriptions of types and categories of damage with illustrative photos. The damage to books is assessed visually. The instructions for carrying out paper pH and double fold tests are also included. The book condition calculator enables to summarize different types of damage easily and receive a general assessment of object condition.

 

The Book Damage Atlas is meant to be used by all establishments and specialists in the field of preservation and also all interested amateurs. No previous knowledge or special skills are required to use this Atlas.

 

The Book Damage Atlas is based on the methodology developed for the project “THULE – The State of Cultural Heritage in Major Estonian Libraries”. The Atlas has been prepared in cooperation between the University of Tartu and the European Research Centre for Book and Paper.  The Atlas has been compiled by Kurmo Konsa and Anu Lepp. In developing the methodology, Mari Siiner, Tiiu Reimo and Jaan Lehtaru were of great help. The Atlas has been prepared in the framework of the ETF grant 8205 “Watermarks and the history of paper in Estonia in the Early Modern period”.

This one also includes a condition calculator: as you browse the atlas, you can select which types of damage the book in question has. Then you can calculate the results, using a numerical scale (1=not so bad, 3=pretty bad, etc). 

Filed under book conservation condition assessment books library preservation condition reports

6 notes &

The Atlas of Digital Damages

(Source: conservethis)

6 notes &

The Atlas of Digital Damages

Looks like a good place to share problems and solutions for digital fails and degradation.

(Source: conservethis)

Filed under digital preservation

1 note &

c4rpe-librum asked: What an awesome job to have!!! I'm jealous :(

Thanks! Yes, it’s pretty awesome, I’m not complaining :)

4 notes &

pawblopicasso:

I’m sorry I’ve been a bit absent lately! I started a new second job with an art conservator working to conserve this Civil War monument in Westminster, MA. It was erected in 1865 to honor the men from Westminster who died in the war. In this photo I am working to remove lichen that has taken up residence on the marble slabs. Unfortunately there are types of lichen that can grow deep into the porous surface of the marble which causes staining. The marble slabs were attached to the granite base with either iron or lead pins. The metal has corroded over the years and has also caused very colorful staining (I happen to think it’s beautiful). After over one hundred years of acid rain, the surface of the marble slabs is receding making it hard to discern the original carvings. I love this kind of work, as I feel like I am doing an honor to these veterans who may otherwise be forgotten, by preserving this monument.

pawblopicasso:

I’m sorry I’ve been a bit absent lately! I started a new second job with an art conservator working to conserve this Civil War monument in Westminster, MA. It was erected in 1865 to honor the men from Westminster who died in the war. In this photo I am working to remove lichen that has taken up residence on the marble slabs. Unfortunately there are types of lichen that can grow deep into the porous surface of the marble which causes staining. The marble slabs were attached to the granite base with either iron or lead pins. The metal has corroded over the years and has also caused very colorful staining (I happen to think it’s beautiful). After over one hundred years of acid rain, the surface of the marble slabs is receding making it hard to discern the original carvings. I love this kind of work, as I feel like I am doing an honor to these veterans who may otherwise be forgotten, by preserving this monument.

Filed under monuments preservation conservation

34 notes &

whitesparrowbindery:

The “Invisible” Box

Like many publisher’s cloth bindings, the textblock of this book was extremely brittle.  A few of the pages in the front of the book had cracked along the inner margin, and were falling out of the book.  Repairing brittle paper can be extremely challenging because it tends to crack along the edge of the repair, causing further damage.

I decided that this book would be better served by a box, which will keep all of the loose pieces together.  Some librarians and collectors dislike boxes because they hide the binding and can turn your bookshelves into a drab wall of identical spines.

To get around this problem, I scanned the spine of the book, and then printed it out on archival paper.  The image of the book’s spine was then adhered to the spine of the box.  When placed on the shelf, it blends in with the other books, making the box “invisible”.

Filed under books