Sofie LH

The Media Conservator

11 notes &

Before and After

Treatment of a Bernard Schultze gouache. 

After a careful dry cleaning the painting was slowly humidified in between sheets of gore-tex. When the paper was relaxed and as flat as possible without damaging the gouache any further the same procedure in reverse order was done, now with dry blotting paper instead of wet. When fully dry and flat the flaking gouache was fixed with a mixture of ethanol and klucel g. Finally the losses of gouache was retouched and the tears restored with japanese tissue.  

Filed under Bernard Schultze restoration paper conservation themediaconservator art

28 notes &

conservethis:

nyupreservation:

When we teach student employees and workshop participants how to make four-flap phase boxes, there is a specific order in which we lay out, mark up, score, and cut out the box that has proven over time to be efficient and to reduce errors. This animated gif shows how to do it!

Dance, boxes! Dance!

conservethis:

nyupreservation:

When we teach student employees and workshop participants how to make four-flap phase boxes, there is a specific order in which we lay out, mark up, score, and cut out the box that has proven over time to be efficient and to reduce errors. This animated gif shows how to do it!

Dance, boxes! Dance!

Filed under books preservation boxes

18 notes &

nyupreservation:

Today in the lab….

Graduate Conservation Assistant Laura Panadero builds sunken housing for eight Daguerrotypes and Ambrotypes. The Ethafoam surroundings keep these delicate images from shifting, and the soft Tyvek lining protects the leather covers from abrasion. Small tabs of Tyvek are secured under the mountings and allow the Daguerrotypes to be pulled up easily, thus reducing the potential for further damage. One Daguerrotype had been separated from its case and required a special 2-level mount to hold the metal mat away from the image surface.

Fales Library & Special Collections

Elizabeth Robins Papers

Fales Family Collection acc.2003.029

Filed under daguerreotype ambrotype photography preservation

11 notes &

Book /Archival Collections and Light Exposure- The University of Iowa Libraries

conservethis:

Let’s stand on our chairs and shout it out loud to the world:

LIGHT DAMAGE IS CUMULATIVE!!!

It adds up, and there’s no way to subtract the damage done by light. Use facsimiles whenever possible!

I’ve got lux and footcandles and UV on the brain since I’ve been taking light-level readings with our light meters by our exhibit cases this week. 

Filed under preservation light paper conservation

202 notes &

captured-castle:

FRAMING A MASTERPIECE

If you’re the framer at a museum, your job is often to ensure that no one really notices what you do, particularly if your choice may obstruct or overpower an art work. Rare is the person who visits the Museum of Modern Art to gawk at the frames on the Picassos or the Pollocks.

This MoMA video captures some of the issues framers consider when approaching a painting as well-known as Andrew Wyeth’s “Christina’s World” (1948), which depicts a woman (Anna Christina Olson) suffering from the muscular deterioration of polio as she crawls across a field in Maine.

(Source: hyperallergic.com, via tallerwarnes)

350 notes &

thegetty:

Start off the dog days of summer right with this American “dog-uerreotype” of man’s best friend.
Far from snapshots, daguerreotypes had exposure times that ranged from a couple seconds to over an hour. How many treats did it take to keep this pooch perched on the table?
Dog Sitting on a Table, hand-colored daguerreotype, about 1854, unknown maker.The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

Start off the dog days of summer right with this American “dog-uerreotype” of man’s best friend.

Far from snapshots, daguerreotypes had exposure times that ranged from a couple seconds to over an hour. How many treats did it take to keep this pooch perched on the table?

Dog Sitting on a Table, hand-colored daguerreotype, about 1854, unknown maker.
The J. Paul Getty Museum

Filed under daguerrotype the getty

2 notes &

The Care and Feeding of Books, 1947

conservethis:

Snip from the post itself:

AIN’T THAT THE TRUTH

Interesting! (Says the conservation nerd)

Filed under Books what not to do

9 notes &

Restoration versus Conservation: overpainting obscuring authenticity

conservethis:

notmodernart:

Many works have been over painted in the past and this can get in the way of authentication.

Philip Mould’s book “The Art Detective” has a nice story about a Gainsborough that had been overpainted obscuring its value

For some reason, this reminded me of Frederick Schultz, the guy who painted up Egyptian artifacts to make them look like fake sourvenirs, so he could smuggle them.

213 notes &

thegetty:

The "artist files" in visionary curator Harald Szeemann’s archive at the Getty Research Institute are now processed and available to researchers!

Housed in some 850 boxes, these files contain records on over 20,000 20th-century artists, from A to Z.

Pictured above: the files of John Baldessari, John Lennon, and Keith Haring

913 notes &

booksnbuildings:

This is a farmer’s almanac, made on vellum in 1513, possibly from Scania.

Folded in its cover, it measures 5 x 5 cm, fully expanded it is 63 cm long. It contains pictures of the months, with chores typical for that. In circles next to the pictures, red lines mark the bright hours of the day, black ones dark. In addition, the calendar has an overview of the holidays and saint’s days for the whole year, each one marked with a little figure illustrating the commemorative day; e.g. a lion for the feastday of St. Mark.

It is kept in the National Library of Denmark

(via conservethis)

Filed under books vellum